British Floods and Climate Change Folk Art Painting in Five Steps

Folk Art/Folk Music….

I create egg tempera folk paintings in the English Peak District National Park, on the borders of Staffordshire and Derbyshire.  My folk art is rather like folk music; it sometimes deals with controversial issues and our ways of life, both rural and urban.

I am an environmentalist and often paint about the state of our world.  This is how I painted my latest work about the link between climate change and the terrible floods suffered by people all over England:

1. Prepare the paint.

Grind the natural pigments with water using a frosted glass muller on a frosted glass plate.

Sue Prince grinds Yellow ochre on frosted glass plate

Yellow ochre being ground on frosted glass plate

2. Prepare the egg yolk.

Prepare the pure egg yolk, adding one teaspoon of water per yolk.

Sue Prince preparing egg yolk

Sue Prince preparing egg yolk

3. Mixing the paint.

Load the pallet with tiny amounts of pigment, drizzle egg yolk over the pigment and mix to required consistency.  The more egg used the more transparent the paint.  Add water when necessary.  Wash brushes often in water then dry on kitchen paper.

Sue Prince mixes the pigment and the egg yolk

Mixing the pigment and the egg yolk on the pallet

2. Preparing the canvas.

I work on canvas prepared with real gesso made of rabbit skin glue and chalk- a bit like a thin, smooth plaster, or herring bone weave linen prepared with acrylic gesso for smaller works.  To mark out my images I either use a weak pigment and water solution or a chalk pastel.

Sue Prince's canvas prepared with rabbit skin glue and chalk gesso

The canvas prepared with rabbit skin glue and chalk gesso

5. Start painting!

I start with outlines in burnt sienna, then fill in the colours.

2nd stage of Sue Prince's egg tempera folk art

2nd stage of egg tempera folk art painting

3rd stage of Sue Prince's egg tempera folk art painting

3rd stage of egg tempera folk art painting

Final stage of Sue Prince's egg tempera folk art painting 'Consequences'

Final stage of egg tempera folk art painting

Exhibitions

The next chance to see my folk art in the UK is my new collection “The World that Hands Built”, a solo exhibition at the Museum of Cannock Chase, Monday 10th March to Sunday 27th April 2014.

Then with three fellow Peak District Artisans, we are putting on a Derbyshire Open Arts exhibition at The Haybarn at Beechenhill Farm, Ilam on 24th, 25th, 26th May, (with light refreshments- CAKE!!)

This year I will be taking part in the 47th Meeting of Naive Artists in Slovenia, in June.  In light of 2014 as European year for Reconciling Work and Family Life they decided to dedicate the whole year  to women artists. Then in August I will be teaching again in the lovely Heritage Park in little Unnaryd, Sweden.

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Sue’s Painting in Top London Exhibition!

I am thrilled to bits!! One of my paintings has been picked for the prestigious Serco Prize for Illustration Exhibition at the London Transport Museum, Covent Garden, London.  I was one of 50 chosen from hundreds of entrants in the Serco Prize for Illustration 2014.

Royal River Pageant 3rd June 2012 by Sue Prince contemporary narrative folk artist

Royal River Pageant 3rd June 2012 by Sue Prince

The London Transport Museum and Serco, in partnership with the Association of Illustrators (AOI), is delighted to host the Serco Prize for Illustration 2014. This year the theme is London Stories.

Across the ages, London has produced and inspired countless stories.  Fictitious or real characters and events in this amazing city have always held fascination, from the anecdotal urban myth to grand tales of historic legend.  The aim of the competition is to attract artwork for display that is colourful, inspiring and celebrates a vibrant, multi layered London.

For the Serco Prize I entered my eye witness painting of the Jubilee River Pageant in 2012. The painting captures the atmosphere, the crowds and even the rain!

Terry and I will be travelling to London for the private view and awards presentation and the launch of ‘London Stories’ on Wednesday 12th February 2014.

I am sooo excited, I already feel as if I have won! Just to have a piece chosen and displayed in this prestigious exhibition in London, is an incredible honour, I am delighted.

There will be award winners; the first prize winner will have their image displayed on a London Transport Museum poster as well as a substantial cash prize.   There is also the possibility that shortlisted images will be featured on merchandise sold in the museum shop.

Check www.sueprinceartist.co.uk to find out what happens!

The next chance to see my folk art in the UK is my new collection “The World that Hands Built”, a solo exhibition at the Museum of Cannock Chase, Monday 10th March to Sunday 27th April 2014.

Then with three fellow Peak District Artisans, we are putting on a Derbyshire Open Arts exhibition at The Haybarn at Beechenhill Farm, Ilam on 24th, 25th, 26th May, (with light refreshments- CAKE!!)

This year I will be taking part in the 47th Meeting of Naive Artists in Slovenia, in June.  In light of 2014 as European year for Reconciling Work and Family Life they decided to dedicate the whole year  to women artists. Then in August I will be teaching again in the lovely Heritage Park in little Unnaryd, Sweden.

Posted in Egg tempera, England, Folk art, Naive art, Painting, Peak District, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

My week painting with a Croatian, a Slovenian, a Serb, two Italians and a Calabrian.

In the Balkans there seems to be a respect and celebration of naïve and folk art unlike anywhere else I have discovered yet….

Sue Prince contemporary narrative folk artist painting in Slovenia as part of the 46th Meeting at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje

Sue Prince contemporary narrative folk artist painting in Slovenia as part of the 46th Meeting at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje

I have just participated in the 46th meeting of International Naïve Painters at the Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov in Trebnje, Slovenia.  I participated in the 43rd meeting which was also a wonderful experience and I now have two paintings in the permanent collection.

Now we farm a different crop by Sue Prince 2009, painted during the 43rd meeting of International Naive Artists at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje

‘Now we farm a different crop’ egg tempera painting by Sue Prince 2009, painted during the 43rd meeting of International Naive Artists at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje

46 years ago the first art camp of naïve artists was held in Trebnje in 1968.   Those artists were so enthused by the experience and the wish to collect and promote naïve art that a gallery was founded in 1971.

Ever since then the Trebnje Gallery has hosted many solo or group exhibitions as well as biennale of Yugoslav naïve art.  Initially the art camps and exhibitions were focused on Yugoslav naïve art. However soon the annual meetings and exhibitions grew to an international scale and so far the gallery has a fund of almost 1100 art works by more than 270 artists from 40 countries (Europe, Asia, Africa and both Americas).

The gallery has toured its collection in different parts of Slovenia, former Yugoslavia, Musée International d’Art Naïf Vicqu and in Insita 94 National Gallery Bratislava. For all these years the gallery has been professionally supported by well established names in the art world.

Naive Artists at the 46th meeting at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje from left to right; Dino Fiorini (Italy), Dobrosav Milojevic (Serbia), Stjepan Ivanec (Croatia), Sue Prince (England), Domenico Gallizzi (Sicily),   Brane Praznik (Slovenia), and Guido Vedovato (Italy)

Naive Artists at the 46th meeting at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje from left to right; Dino Fiorini (Italy), Dobrosav Milojevic (Serbia), Stjepan Ivanec (Croatia), Sue Prince (England), Domenico Gallizzi (Calabria), Brane Praznik (Slovenia), and Guido Vedovato (Italy)

My week painting alongside Dino Fiorini (Italy), Domenico Gallizzi (Calabria), Stjepan Ivanec (Croatia), Dobrosav Milojevic (Serbia), Brane Praznik (Slovenia) and Guido Vedovato (Italy) was inspirational and great fun.  It is so interesting getting to understand the motivations of other painters; what makes them paint through the night after a long day a work?  We found so much in common- except language! Although I managed to communicate with a bit of franglais/swedo/german with Italian/latin highlights.

'The Gods meant that I should dance' 2013 egg tempera painting by Sue Prince contemporary narrative folk artist, showing Ripley Morris Men from Derbyshire England.

‘The Gods meant that I should dance’ 2013 egg tempera painting by Sue Prince contemporary narrative folk artist, showing Ripley Morris Men from Derbyshire England.

My 2013 painting was about English Morris Dancing, illustrating Ripley Morris Men.  My explanations of English Morris Dancing were somewhat ill-informed and the only reason I could think was the motivation of beer!!  I have since been reassured by Morris Men themselves that the importance of beer cannot be overstated!

Everyday we were visited by about 100 school children who were very keen to learn about art and painting and practice their languages.

Children visiting Naive Artists at the 46th meeting at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje

Children visiting Naive Artists at the 46th meeting at Galerija Likovnih Samorastnikov Trebnje

Slovenia is a wonderful holiday destination and we are so smitten we’ll be returning shortly to Trebnje and then Piran for a few days rest, food and good company!

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