British Floods and Climate Change Folk Art Painting in Five Steps

Folk Art/Folk Music….

I create egg tempera folk paintings in the English Peak District National Park, on the borders of Staffordshire and Derbyshire.  My folk art is rather like folk music; it sometimes deals with controversial issues and our ways of life, both rural and urban.

I am an environmentalist and often paint about the state of our world.  This is how I painted my latest work about the link between climate change and the terrible floods suffered by people all over England:

1. Prepare the paint.

Grind the natural pigments with water using a frosted glass muller on a frosted glass plate.

Sue Prince grinds Yellow ochre on frosted glass plate

Yellow ochre being ground on frosted glass plate

2. Prepare the egg yolk.

Prepare the pure egg yolk, adding one teaspoon of water per yolk.

Sue Prince preparing egg yolk

Sue Prince preparing egg yolk

3. Mixing the paint.

Load the pallet with tiny amounts of pigment, drizzle egg yolk over the pigment and mix to required consistency.  The more egg used the more transparent the paint.  Add water when necessary.  Wash brushes often in water then dry on kitchen paper.

Sue Prince mixes the pigment and the egg yolk

Mixing the pigment and the egg yolk on the pallet

2. Preparing the canvas.

I work on canvas prepared with real gesso made of rabbit skin glue and chalk- a bit like a thin, smooth plaster, or herring bone weave linen prepared with acrylic gesso for smaller works.  To mark out my images I either use a weak pigment and water solution or a chalk pastel.

Sue Prince's canvas prepared with rabbit skin glue and chalk gesso

The canvas prepared with rabbit skin glue and chalk gesso

5. Start painting!

I start with outlines in burnt sienna, then fill in the colours.

2nd stage of Sue Prince's egg tempera folk art

2nd stage of egg tempera folk art painting

3rd stage of Sue Prince's egg tempera folk art painting

3rd stage of egg tempera folk art painting

Final stage of Sue Prince's egg tempera folk art painting 'Consequences'

Final stage of egg tempera folk art painting

Exhibitions

The next chance to see my folk art in the UK is my new collection “The World that Hands Built”, a solo exhibition at the Museum of Cannock Chase, Monday 10th March to Sunday 27th April 2014.

Then with three fellow Peak District Artisans, we are putting on a Derbyshire Open Arts exhibition at The Haybarn at Beechenhill Farm, Ilam on 24th, 25th, 26th May, (with light refreshments- CAKE!!)

This year I will be taking part in the 47th Meeting of Naive Artists in Slovenia, in June.  In light of 2014 as European year for Reconciling Work and Family Life they decided to dedicate the whole year  to women artists. Then in August I will be teaching again in the lovely Heritage Park in little Unnaryd, Sweden.

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This entry was posted in climate change, Derbyshire, Egg tempera, England, Floods, Folk art, Naive art, Painting, Peak District, Staffordshire, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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